Tuesday, June 8, 2010

Approaching the EDIT

PUT THE AUDIENCE FIRST. CUT TO ENRICH THEIR VIEWING EXPERIENCE
As editors, we're thinking audience all the time, I've always said editors are proxy for audience. We love our audience, and we want them to be happy and be enriched. And we want them to stay with it, of course, especially if it's for television

WHEN SCREENING DAILIES, BE SENSITIVE TO THE WAY THE FOOTAGE WAS CAPTURED. 
TRY TO SEE WHAT THE CAMERA PERSON SAW IN IT, THE LIFE AND MEANING OF THE MOMENT. BUT DON'T USE MATERIAL PURELY FOR ITS STRONG AESTHETIC VALUES
Cameraman like what I do with their material, or obvious reasons. I respect the quality of what they're doing. I don't muscle it into some intellectual thing. I respect their curiosity. I use their curiosity, it matches my own. And of course, that doesn't mean that therefore I use only their best stuff. But, I'm certainly very sensitive to what I think is effective material. Very often I lose their best stuff, because it doesn't work

DON'T SPOON-FEED THE AUDIENCE. TRUST THEM TO DISCOVER THEIR MEANING OF THE FILM
To a lot of television producers, a documentary is like a term paper. They're not loving the audience, particularly. They believe you have to tell them what they're going to see, tell them what they're seeing, and tell them what they saw. There's an excessive use of narration in television because that's the one thing they know how to do, they were taught well in college and they know how to write. And the audience is just switching channels, or dozing off, because they's spoon-fed. So you have to wrestle with that, and argue for the audience. I would rather confront someone I'm working with than make a heavily scripted film that is totally boring the hell out of an audience

- Larry Silk 

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